039 – South of the Border



Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, courtesy of Wikipedia

Before delving into the Adams administration’s foreign policy in Latin America, this episode takes us on a very high level overview of the Latin American Wars of Independence. From the Rio de la Plata to Mexico City, and from Quito to Rio de Janeiro, we explore the hows and whys various Spanish and Portuguese Americans decided to declare independence from their respective countries. A note of caution here: I am an expert in neither the Spanish nor the Portuguese language, so I apologize in advance for any mispronunciations. They are certainly not indicative of any disrespect for the cultures or the peoples of Latin America as I have come out of the research for this episode with an increased respect for and fascination with the histories of the region. Source information for this episode can be found at http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.


One Year Anniversary Special Episode



Fourth of July at the Washington Monument, 1986, by SSGT Lono Kollars, courtesy of Wikipedia

In honor of my one year anniversary of podcasting, I did this special episode to run simultaneously on the Presidencies of the United States to share a little bit about how I got started podcasting, some information about our audience, and a chance for you to be entered into a drawing for a gift card to Powell’s Books.

The survey mentioned in the episode can be found at https://goo.gl/forms/AKCJOi0LEOCXv1ce2, but you must complete it as instructed by July 31st and leave your name and email address to be entered into the drawing. Please note: If you haven’t already, I do ask that you listen to at least one episode of either podcast (and this one doesn’t count) before participating in the drawing so that you can give feedback to help make the podcasts better as we go into year two. Thanks so much in advance!


038 – Source Notes



Albert Gallatin [c. 1848], courtesy of Wikipedia
Audio editing for this episode done by Andrew Pfannkuche

  • Burton, Theodore E. “Henry Clay Secretary of State March 7, 1825, to March 3, 1829.” The American Secretaries of State and Their Diplomacy, Volume III and Volume IV. Samuel Flagg Bemis, ed. New York: Pageant Book Co, 1958. pp. 115-158.
  • Dungan, Nicholas. Gallatin: America’s Swiss Founding Father. New York and London: New York University Press, 2010.
  • Graebner, Norman A, and George C Herring. “Henry Clay, Realist.” The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. 107:4 (Autumn 2009) 551-576.
  • Hargreaves, Mary W M. The Presidency of John Quincy Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1985.
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.
  • Register of Debates in Congress, Volume I: Comprising the Leading Debates and Incidents of the Second Session of the Eighteenth Congress Together with an Appendix, Containing the Most Important State Papers and Public Documents to Which the Session Has Given Birth, to Which are Added, the Laws Enacted During the Session With a Copious Index to the Whole. Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1825. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llrd&fileName=001/llrd001.db&recNum=373 [Last Accessed: 17 Jun 2017]
  • Remini, Robert V. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union. New York: W W Norton & Co, 1991.
  • White, Leonard D. The Jeffersonians: A Study in Administrative History, 1801-1829. New York: Macmillan Co, 1956.

038 – The Nation’s Chief Diplomat



The State Department Building, c. 1865, courtesy of Wikipedia

Henry Clay takes over the State Department and finds he has big shoes to fill coming in after John Quincy Adams. As he assumes his duties, he is forced to deal with personal tragedy, poor health, and difficult diplomatic negotiations. Though scoring some wins abroad as new treaties are entered into, Clay only meets with frustration when dealing with the British and with folks back home in Kentucky. Listen in as we discuss the period of Clay’s life that one historian calls “the least congenial period of his whole official life.” Source information for this episode can be found at http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.


037 – Source Notes



Ashland, Henry Clay’s estate, courtesy of Analogue Kid on Wikipedia

Audio editing for this episode done by Andrew Pfannkuche.

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Coit, Margaret L. John C Calhoun: American Portrait. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co, 1950.
  • Dangerfield, George. The Era of Good Feelings. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1952.
  • Fischer, David Hackett. The Revolution of American Conservatism: The Federalist Party in the Era of Jeffersonian Democracy. New York: Harper & Row, 1965.
  • Hargreaves, Mary W M. The Presidency of John Quincy Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1985.
  • Hopkins, James F. “Election of 1824.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill Book Co, 1971. pp. 349-381.
  • Landry, Jerry. Harrison Podcast. http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832. New York: Harper & Row, 1981.
  • Remini, Robert V. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union. New York: W W Norton & Co, 1991.
  • Sublette, Ned, and Constance Sublette. The American Slave Coast: A History of the Slave-Breeding Industry. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2016.
  • Turner, Lynn W. “Elections of 1816 and 1820.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill Book Co, 1971. pp. 299-321.

037 – The Compromiser is Compromised



William H Crawford by John Wesley Jarvis [c. 1810s], courtesy of Wikipedia
Henry Clay’s desire for the presidency grows as 1824 nears, but before he can try for that seat, he has to help hold the nation together during the Missouri Crisis and navigate through the perilous waters of personal debt. This episode takes us through James Monroe’s second term of office and the political maneuverings in the lead up to the election dubbed “The War of the Giants.” Source information for this episode can be found at http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.


036 – Source Notes



Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry by Thomas Lawrence [c. 1809-1810], courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery
Audio editing for this episode done by Andrew Pfannkuche.

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Bemis, Samuel Flagg. John Quincy Adams and the Foundations of American Foreign Policy. New York: Knopf, 1956.
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Green, Constance McLaughlin. Washington, Volume I: Village and Capital, 1800-1878. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962.
  • Ketcham, Ralph. James Madison: A Biography. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994 [1971].
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821. New York: Harper & Row, 1977.
  • Remini, Robert V. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union. New York: W W Norton & Co, 1991.
  • Rutland, Robert Allen. The Presidency of James Madison. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1990.

036 – No Fear, No More



Portrait of James Monroe by Samuel Morse [c. 1819], courtesy of Wikipedia
Henry Clay’s return from Europe following the War of 1812 marks a change both in the trajectory of the nation as well as Clay’s relationship with the Republican executive administration starting with James Monroe’s inauguration in 1819. Clay takes on Monroe, John Quincy Adams, and Andrew Jackson as he attempts to exert his influence over the American political landscape (as well as possibly position himself for the presidency). Source information for this episode can be found at http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.


035 – Source Notes



Ribbon for a Harrison Campaign Rally, 1840, courtesy of Wikipedia

If you’d like to learn more about Ron’s research on the 1840 campaign, the best source is of course his book. The Carnival Campaign is available at Barnes & Noble or other booksellers.

For other interviews with Ron:

Audio for this episode was edited by Andrew Pfannkuche.


035 – Interview with Ron Shafer



   

Ron Shafer, author of The Carnival Campaign, shares his insight into the 1840 presidential campaign, some of the prominent figures and circumstances of the time, and how he feels that William Henry Harrison is the figure from the 1840 campaign that people should know more about. During the course of the interview, Ron brings in his experience as a former Wall Street Journal reporter and editor, in particular his writing the page one column The Washington Wire, to share with listeners how the 1840 campaign in particular and early American politics in particular compares with our own time.

More information about this episode can be found at http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com.